RNews Digest: 15 September 2017

By RNL Editors | 09/15/2017

News and perspectives important to RNs and the profession of nursing, gathered from sources around the world.

Hurricane Harvey no match for health IT
HealthLeaders Media, Alexandra Wilson Pecci, 12 September 2017
Electronic communications and cloud-based tools helped healthcare providers in Texas deliver patient care before, during, and after the storm.

What’s one of America’s most dangerous jobs? It’s not what you think.
The Washington Post, Petula Dvorak, 11 September 2017
They are routinely yelled at, spat at, pummeled, kicked, scratched and even stabbed by the people they’re trying to save. In many states, being a nurse is more dangerous than being a police officer or a prison guard. It’s a profession with a stunning amount of violence.

Duke study to determine optimal patient repositioning intervals to prevent pressure ulcers
PR Newswire, 13 September 2017
Duke University School of Nursing researchers have launched a five-year study to determine optimal timing for turning or repositioning patients to reduce the risk of pressure ulcers.

The case for supporting nursing directors
HealthLeaders Media, Jennifer Threw, 12 September 2017
Providing the correct ratio of directors to managers is a good start toward positioning nurse managers to develop their leadership skills.

NHS checks 'should be done at shops and stadiums'
BBC News, Nick Triggle, 12 September 2017
Vital health checks should be carried out in shops and at football grounds to diagnose people at risk of heart attacks and strokes, NHS chiefs say. NHS England and Public Health England are urging the novel approach to get more people to come forward for the over-40s checks programme.

Making sense of California’s End of Life Option Act
UCSF Science of Caring, Andrew Schwartz, September 2017
When Governor Jerry Brown signed California’s End of Life Option Act (EOLOA) into law in 2015, Barbara Koenig believed it presented the state with “a bioethics emergency.”

A rare dementia gene runs in the family, but he’s fine — so far
Kaiser Health News, JoNel Aleccia, 11 September 2017
John Janda, a building contractor, credits hard work, a healthful diet and vitamin supplements for his continued vigor, despite having a genetic marker for a rare form of dementia.

Nurses have tools to help prevent sepsis
Nurse.com, Sallie Jimenez, 12 September 2017
September is National Sepsis Awareness Month, and several organizations are working to educate the public and healthcare professionals on how to prevent the condition by exploring the impact it has on Americans.

What Hurricane Harvey taught this medical student about patient care
KevinMD.com, Weijie Violet Lin, 12 September 2017
“Apocalyptic” was the word used by my fellow volunteers at the local church, a temporary shelter for displaced families on post-hurricane-landfall day 3.

Characteristics of nursing excellence
American Nurse Today (Editorial), Lilllee Gelinas, September 2017
What’s behind Magnet®-recognized organizations? Fewer than 9% of all hospitals in the United States achieve Magnet recognition, and an even smaller number achieve it three or more times. Are they lucky? Is it just a fluke? I don’t think so.

Preparing for an active shooter in a healthcare setting
Scrubs, 11 September 2017
Active shooter incidents throughout the country have prompted individuals and organizations, including hospitals and other healthcare facilities, to consider response plans for an “active shooter”.

—Compiled by Paula Jeffers
Reflections on Nursing Leadership 

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  • RNews Digest: 15 September 2017