Noteworthy member news

By RNL editorial staff | 02/01/2019

Acknowledging achievements of Sigma members.

Noteworthy Member News

Daily, Sigma members advance world health through scholarship, leadership, and service. Below are some who have been recognized for their achievements. 

Gale AdcockGale Adcock, a member of the North Carolina House of Representatives in the United States, has received the Barbara Thoman Curtis Award from the American Nurses Association in recognition of her significant contributions to nursing practice and health policy through political and legislative activity. A nurse practitioner since 1987, she is chief health officer at SAS Institute and is serving a three-year term on the State Health Coordinating Council. Adcock is past president of the North Carolina Nurses Association, past chair of the North Carolina Center for Nursing, and a two-term member of the NC Board of Nursing.

Jose AlejandroJose Alejandro, director of case management at UC Health in Orange, California, USA, assumed the role of president of the Case Management Society of America for 2018-20. A prominent expert in case management and at-risk populations, Alejandro was president of the National Association of Hispanic Nurses from 2012 to 2014. He is treasurer of the Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society of Nursing Building Corporation.

Arnold AltiverosArnold Altiveros was one of five nurse practitioner students selected to receive a traineeship grant to participate in the Advanced Nursing Education Workforce (ANEW) program of Nicole Wertheim College of Nursing & Health Sciences at Florida International University in Miami, Florida, USA. ANEW is a two-year, $1.39 million nursing education initiative funded by the U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration to prepare advanced practice nurses to provide primary care in rural and underserved areas. Altiveros is a student in the college’s Foreign-Educated Physician to BSN/MSN program and works as a telemetry/ICMU nurse at Memorial Regional Hospital in Hollywood, Florida. His medical degree training in general surgery from the Philippines focused on providing healthcare services in the country’s most rural and desolate areas, where resources are limited.

Diane R. AndrewsDiane R. Andrews, an associate professor at the University of Central Florida College of Nursing in Orlando, Florida, USA, received an Excellence in Nursing Education Award from the Florida Organization of Nurse Executives for her significant contributions to nursing education, including using best practices, evidence-based practice and research, and innovative approaches as an educator. A member of the college faculty since 2006, Andrews serves as program director of the school’s leadership and management MSN and post-master’s executive DNP programs. Andrews also contributes to nursing education through her research, which examines new graduate nurses transitioning into practice.

Appelbaum_Michelle_SFWMichelle Gellman Appelbaum, a nurse practitioner at New Windsor Pediatrics in New Windsor, New York, USA, has been elected president of The Nurse Practitioner Association New York State. She has more than 25 years of experience as a nurse practitioner, with a special interest in developmental disabilities, autism, and ADHD. Her PhD research focused on fathers of children with severe cerebral palsy. She holds board certification as a family nurse practitioner, pediatric nurse practitioner, and pediatric primary care mental health specialist. 

Yuki AsakuraYuki Asakura, a palliative care advanced practice nurse at Parker Adventist Hospital in Parker, Colorado, USA, has received a 2018 National Magnet Nurse of the Year award from the American Nurses Credentialing Center. She formed the hospital’s first palliative care program to improve knowledge and awareness and collaborated with an interdisciplinary team to increase palliative care referral volume by 400 percent, well above the national benchmark. Asakura is a well-known expert, respected leader, and mentor in the oncology and palliative care community whose mission is to educate clinicians, physicians, patients, and families around the globe. In her native Japan, she is a strong advocate for end-of-life care to minimize suffering of people with advanced illness.

Barbra Bachmeier Barbra Bachmeier of Indianapolis, Indiana, USA, has been named a fellow of the Academy of Emergency Nursing. The Emergency Nurses Association (ENA) created the academy in 2004 to recognize members for their enduring and substantial contributions to emergency nursing throughout their careers. Additionally, inductees are honored as leaders in the ongoing effort to advance the profession and ENA. Click here to view complete list of new fellows.

Terry A. BadgerTerry A. Badger, a professor at the University of Arizona College of Nursing in Tucson, Arizona, USA, has received a four-year, $2.5 million National Cancer Institute grant to study a precision approach to decrease psychological distress in cancer patients and their family caregivers during treatment. The project seeks to determine if two interventions that already have proven successful in previous research can be employed in a Sequential Multiple Assignment Randomized Trial, or SMART. Badger is principal investigator for the study.

Michele BalasMichele Balas, an associate professor at The Ohio State University College of Nursing in Columbus, Ohio, USA, is co-leader of a multidisciplinary research team that will assess the effects of Reiki, a complementary health therapy, on pain and anxiety in critically ill older adults. The American Association of Critical-Care Nurses has awarded the team an Impact Research Grant to support the study, which will assess whether Reiki is superior to sham Reiki placebo and usual care when delivered to critically ill older adults who require mechanical ventilation.

Karen BankstonKaren Bankston, associate dean for clinical practice, partnership, and community engagement at the University of Cincinnati College of Nursing in Cincinnati, Ohio, USA, has received a 2018 Diversity, Inclusion and Sustainability in Nursing Education Award from Nurse.com by OnCourse Learning and the American Association of Colleges of Nursing. In this role, she is responsible for developing and maintaining partnerships with nursing and other disciplines while engaging in community-based research on student and parental success in the urban core.

Judy Beal Judy Beal was appointed the inaugural dean of the College of Natural, Behavioral, and Health Sciences at Simmons University in Boston, Massachusetts, USA, effective 1 September 2018. She previously served as professor and dean of the School of Nursing and Health Sciences at Simmons University, where she pioneered the successful expansion of the Master of Family Nurse Practitioner Program to an online curriculum. She was also instrumental in building early innovative models of academic practice partnerships both locally and globally, including international collaborations with Egypt, Saudi Arabia, and Israel. Beal was elected chair-elect of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) for two years and will serve as board chair from 2020-22. Her longtime affiliation with AACN includes service as secretary, board member-at-large, chair of the Nominating Committee, and chair of the AACN/AONE Steering Committee on Academic-Practice Partnerships. 

Hannah BergbowerHannah Bergbower, an associate scholar for the Center for Global Health at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, has been named a March of Dimes MOMentum 2018 Gretchen Carlson Advocacy Fellow. The yearlong fellowship begins with the MOMentum Meetup, a series of workshops on grassroots organizing and advocacy, and culminates with a Congressional day-of-action meeting with key legislators and staff. Launched in partnership with Carlson and supported by her Gift of Courage Fund, the MOMentum Gretchen Carlson Advocacy Fellowship will engage and empower fellows through regular training with leaders in maternal and child health and advocacy to learn how to shape public discussion, influence their networks, and engage others.

Kaitlin BestKaitlin Best, a clinician at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and a postdoctoral fellow in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, is lead researcher for a study that will evaluate whether the Individualized Numeric Rating Scale can help ICU nurses assess pain in critically ill children with neurodevelopmental disabilities. The program has received an Impact Research Grant from the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

Kelly Betts Kelly Betts began her new role as an assistant dean of the University of Nebraska Medical Center College of Nursing, West Nebraska Division, in Scottsbluff, Nebraska, USA, in August 2018. She previously was an assistant professor at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences College of Nursing in Little Rock, Arkansas, USA, where she served as associate dean for undergraduate education from 2012-16. She collaborated on interprofessional grant proposals, including one on oral health initiatives, and was active in using technology to foster interprofessional education.

Ab BrodyAb Brody, associate director of the Hartford Institute for Geriatric Nursing and founder of Aliviado Health, has been awarded a $6.1 million grant from the U.S. National Institute on Aging to study the program Brody designed to bring effective care to people with dementia who are receiving hospice care. The two-phase, five-year grant will fund the first large-scale clinical trial of people with dementia in hospice and their caregivers. The first phase will be a yearlong process to further tailor Aliviado Dementia Care for the hospice setting, establish the infrastructure to study the program, and pilot the program in two hospice agencies. The second phase will roll out a randomized clinical trial in 25 hospice agencies across the United States. Brody is an associate professor at NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing in New York, New York, USA.

Broome_Marion_SFWMarion Broome, dean and the Ruby Wilson professor of nursing at Duke University’s School of Nursing in Durham, North Carolina, USA, was awarded an honorary doctorate by the University of Massachusetts Medical School in June 2018. Broome is also vice chancellor for nursing affairs at Duke University and associate vice president for academic affairs for nursing at Duke University Health System. She is a renowned expert in pediatric nursing research and practice. With funding from the National Institutes of Health, the American Cancer Society, and other foundations, her clinical research has involved developing new interventions to help children cope with acute and chronic pain. More recently, her work has explored ethical considerations in pediatric clinical trials and publishing. Broome serves as editor-in-chief of Nursing Outlook, the journal of the American Academy of Nursing and the Council for Advancing Nursing Science.

Maria Calloway Maria Calloway was named chief nursing officer for Providence Health in Columbia, South Carolina, USA, in June 2018. Previously, she was chief nursing officer for Providence Medford Medical Center, Central Florida Regional Hospital, and Granville Health System, where she also served as patient safety and quality officer. She was a first lieutenant in the U.S. Army Reserve.

Jacquelyn CampbellJacquelyn Campbell, a professor at Johns Hopkins School of Nursing in Baltimore, Maryland, USA, has received the Ada Sue Hinshaw Award from the Friends of the National Institute for Nursing Research and has been named a 2018 Living Legend and an Edge Runner by the American Academy of Nursing. The awards reflect Campbell’s longstanding contributions to domestic violence prevention and career-long leadership in nursing and research. Through federally funded investigations, her research has led to creation of interdisciplinary knowledge about violence and health outcomes, risk assessment for lethal domestic violence, and coordinated response to intimate partner violence from within the justice system, social services, and healthcare organizations. One of her most influential developments is the Danger Assessment, an instrument to assist abused women in accurately determining their level of danger. Her most recent research examines the intersection of HIV and violence against women and how head injuries and strangulation from intimate partner violence can result in undiagnosed traumatic brain injury.

Benjamin CanhaBenjamin Canha, a clinical instructor at the University of Maryland School of Nursing at the Universities at Shady Grove in Rockland, Maryland, USA, is one of seven nurse educators nationwide to receive the National League for Nursing Foundation for Nursing Education Scholarship Award. Canha serves as a nurse educator and nurse researcher role model in a field where men are only about 10 percent of the workforce. For his dissertation, he is researching the effects of humor in supporting those recovering from opioid use disorder to engage, assimilate, and maintain involvement with behavioral treatments and continue their recovery.

Seon-Yoon ChungSeon-Yoon Chung, an assistant professor in the Department of Organizational Systems and Adult Health at the University of Maryland School of Nursing in Baltimore, Maryland, USA, has received a $20,000 New Nurse Faculty Award. She has expertise in adult health, simulation education, and culturally competent care. The award is funded through the Nurse Support Program II, a statewide initiative aimed at increasing the number of nursing faculty. Funds can be used to supplement a fellow’s salary, pay for graduate education expenses, and cover professional development and associated costs.

Sean Clarke Sean Clarke was named executive vice dean for academic affairs at NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing in New York, New York, USA, effective 2 January 2019. He directs the college’s faculty affairs and provides operational leadership in achievement of its academic and strategic goals. He is a leading nurse academic and health services researcher who studies quality and safety issues in acute care hospitals, workforce issues, occupational safety of nurses, and influences of economic and political factors on healthcare delivery and the nursing profession. Clarke previously was associate dean for undergraduate programs and a professor at Boston College’s Connell School of Nursing.

Sharon Saunderson Coffey Sharon Saunderson Coffey of Madison, Alabama, USA, has been named a fellow of the Academy of Emergency Nursing. The Emergency Nurses Association (ENA) created the academy in 2004 to recognize members for their enduring and substantial contributions to emergency nursing throughout their careers. Additionally, inductees are honored as leaders in the ongoing effort to advance the profession and ENA. Click here to view complete list of new fellows.

Cynthia ConnollyCynthia Connolly, who holds the Rosemarie B. Greco term endowed associate professorship in advocacy at the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, has received the Arthur J. Viseltear Prize for her book Children and Drug Safety: Balancing Risk and Protection in Twentieth Century America. The American Public Health Association noted that the book addresses a critical gap in public health histories of childhood and contributes to ongoing debates in the United States on prescriptions and the role of experts. Connolly is also an associate professor in Penn Nursing’s Department of Family & Community Health; associate director of the Barbara Bates Center for the Study of the History of Nursing; co-faculty director at the Field Center for Children’s Policy, Practice, and Research; and a senior fellow at Penn’s Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics.

Karen CoxKaren Cox was named president of Chamberlain University in Downers Grove, Illinois, USA, in August 2018. An accomplished nursing and healthcare leader, she most recently served as executive vice president and chief operating officer of Children’s Mercy-Kansas City, an independent academic medical center in Missouri. She is president of the American Academy of Nursing and was previously elected to the American Hospital Association Section on Maternal and Child Health Governing Council. She also was appointed to the Child Health Committee of the Children’s Hospital Association.

Kim CurryKim Curry was named editor in chief for the Journal of American Association of Nurse Practitioners in January 2018. She is a clinical associate professor at the University of Florida at Gainesville College of Nursing in Gainesville, Florida, USA. She brings more than three decades of experience to the journal as an author of book chapters, monographs, and refereed publications. She has delivered numerous lectures, speeches, and posters in state, local, national, and international presentations. The recipient of many honors and awards, she has been recognized for excellence in clinical practice, research, and innovation in her role as faculty.

Kenneth W. Dion Kenneth W. Dion was appointed assistant dean for business development and strategic relationships at Johns Hopkins School of Nursing in Baltimore, Maryland, USA, in June 2018. In this newly created position, he shapes and leads business ventures, establishes and enhances partnerships for strategic nursing outreach, and leverages faculty and student expertise to create and advance technologies. After earning his bachelor’s degree in nursing from the University of Central Florida, he worked in emergency care and soon began consulting on healthcare information systems selection and implementation. Upon completion of his graduate degrees, he launched the first high-availability electronic medical record in healthcare at Texas Children’s Hospital and earned patents for technologies developed to enhance healthcare business objectives and processes. In 1999, Dion founded Decision Critical Inc., a cloud-based information systems company for meeting the education, compliance, and competency development needs of healthcare organizations. He has since founded TurnPath LLC, a healthcare technology innovation incubator. Dion is currently treasurer of Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society of Nursing (Sigma).

Joanne M. DischJoanne M. Disch, the inaugural chair of the Advocate Aurora Health Care board of directors and chair of the Chamberlain University board of trustees, was named a Living Legend by the American Academy of Nursing (AAN). As a founding leader of the QSEN initiative, she launched an international movement to make healthcare safer. She championed fair and just cultures in nursing schools and advanced the concept of person- and family-centered care. As American Association of Critical-Care Nurses president in the 1980s, Disch fortified relationships with specialty nursing organizations. In the 1990s, she brought together and led two nursing departments after a merger. Later, as AAN president, she spearheaded the Raise the Voice campaign and its signature Edge Runner program. She is co-author of Person and Family Centered Care, published by Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society of Nursing (Sigma).

Michael L. Evans Michael L. Evans has received the Margretta Madden Styles President’s Award from the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC). The award recognizes his outstanding service as president and a board member of ANCC and board director of ANCC World. Evans is dean, professor, and University Medical Center endowed chair for excellence in nursing at Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center School of Nursing. The President’s Award recognizes exceptional leaders who have partnered with the ANCC president to advance the mission, vision, and strategic goals of the American Nurses Credentialing Center.

Joyce J. FitzpatrickJoyce J. Fitzpatrick has received the 2019 International Achievement Award from the International Council of Nurses and the Florence Nightingale International Foundation, acknowledging her international contributions in advancing nursing education through research, innovative conceptual models, and theory development. Fitzpatrick is the inaugural director of the Marian K. Shaughnessy Nurse Leadership Academy and the Elizabeth Brooks Ford professor of nursing at Case Western Reserve University’s Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing in Cleveland, Ohio, USA.

Karen J. FoliKaren J. Foli, an associate professor and director of the PhD in Nursing Program at Purdue University School of Nursing in West Lafayette, Indiana, USA, has received the 2018 American Psychiatric Nurses Association Award for Media for her book, Nursing Care of Adoption and Kinship Families: A Clinical Guide for Advanced Practice Nurses. The comprehensive textbook is supported by evidence-based research and makes the connection between research and clinical best practices. As the adoptive parent of a daughter, Foli knows firsthand the significant influence of advanced practice nurses as adoption and kinship families seek healthcare.

Dawn Garzon MaaksDawn Garzon Maaks assumed the office of president of the National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners in July 2018. She replaced Tresa Zielinski, who stepped into the immediate past president role. Garzon Maaks maintains a clinical practice in pediatric behavioral and mental health for a federally qualified health center in southwest Washington, where she cares for individuals from preschool through young adulthood.

Natima GeisNatima Geis has been awarded a 2018 March of Dimes Graduate Nursing Scholarship for postgraduate studies in the field of maternal-child nursing. She is pursuing a Master of Science in Nursing at Vanderbilt University School of Nursing in Nashville, Tennessee, USA, with a specialization in midwifery. Geis is deeply committed to serving her rural community, particularly its underserved and disenfranchised populations. She has demonstrated a keen understanding of the importance of continuity of care for women and babies over the course of pregnancy, childbirth, postpartum, and infant care. Geis is a volunteer doula and has clinical experience in caring for mothers and babies during labor and delivery and in the hospital newborn intensive care unit.

Kim Glassman Kim Glassman has been named Lerner director for health promotion at NYU Langone in New York, New York, USA. The newly endowed position in the nursing and patient care services departments recognizes her innovations in helping the university attain some of the top patient outcomes and satisfaction ratings nationwide. In this role, Glassman provides vision and leadership for the integration of health and wellness practices, with a focus on a holistic approach to care for both patients and staff. She is one of just four chief nursing officers nationwide to receive an endowed title. She is also senior vice president for patient care services and chief nursing officer at NYU Langone Health and associate dean for partnership innovation at NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing. Photo credit: NYU Langone Health.

Greer GlazerGreer Glazer, dean and Schmidlapp professor of nursing at the University of Cincinnati College of Nursing in Cincinnati, Ohio, USA, has received a 2018 Diversity, Inclusion and Sustainability in Nursing Education Award from Nurse.com by OnCourse Learning and the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN). Glazer also serves as associate vice president for health affairs at the university. She has been an AACN board member and was instrumental in developing and advancing AACN’s initiatives on diversity and inclusion.

Doris GrinspunDoris Grinspun, chief executive officer of the Registered Nurses’ Association of Ontario (RNAO), was inducted as a fellow of the American Academy of Nursing during ceremonies at the organization’s annual policy conference in Washington, D.C., USA, in November 2018. She is the founder and visionary of RNAO’s internationally renowned Best Practice Guidelines Program and a leading figure in health and nursing policy. Grinspun has been recognized with numerous awards and investitures for her lifelong work as a bold and compelling leader, expertise in evidence-based practice, and powerful voice for social justice and universal access. She is co-author of Transforming Nursing Through Knowledge: Best Practices for Guideline Development, Implementation Science, and Evaluation, published by Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society of Nursing (Sigma). Click here to access complete list of 2018 academy fellows.

Susan GroenwaldSusan Groenwald retired as president of Chamberlain University, and her title is now president emeritus. She led the evolution of Chamberlain University from one campus to 21 campuses and developed all undergraduate and graduate nursing programs. She established the Chamberlain Care culture, which created an environment that embodies excellence in nursing and was the basis of a book she published last fall. She successfully launched master’s and doctoral degrees and, most recently, the Master of Public Health Program. Groenwald will continue her affiliation with Adtalem as a board member for the Adtalem Foundation and as a trustee for Ross University School of Medicine and Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine.

Mitchell Guanzon Mitchell Guanzon is one of five nurse practitioner students selected to receive a traineeship grant to participate in the Advanced Nursing Education Workforce (ANEW) program of Nicole Wertheim College of Nursing & Health Sciences at Florida International University in Miami, Florida, USA. ANEW is a two-year, $1.39 million nursing education initiative funded by the U.S. Human Resources & Services Administration to prepare advanced practice nurses to provide primary care in rural and underserved areas. Guanzon is a telemetry/ICMU nurse at Memorial Regional Hospital in Hollywood, Florida, and was selected from the university’s Foreign-Educated Physician to BSN/MSN program. He was a fourth-year medical student in Manila, Philippines, where he spent four-week rotations in very rural communities as the sole healthcare provider. His academic background also includes time as a research associate at Case Western University in Cleveland, Ohio.

Judith HaberJudith Haber, the Ursula Springer leadership professor in nursing at NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing in New York, New York, USA, has been appointed to a work group meeting convened to identify and discuss significant oral health issues that will inform the U.S. surgeon general's 20-year update report on oral health. The report will document progress since the 2000 report, Oral Health in America, as well as identify gaps in knowledge and articulate a vision for the future. Haber, executive director of the Oral Health Nursing Education and Practice program at NYU Meyers, has spent the past decade integrating oral health into overall health, particularly through interprofessional education.

Lisa HansonLisa Hanson, professor and director of the Nurse-Midwifery Program at Marquette University College of Nursing in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA, has received a $241,845 grant from the National Institutes of Health and National Institute for Child Health and Disease. The grant for “The efficacy of an oral probiotic to reduce group B streptococcus (GBS) colonization” is Hanson’s first from the organization. The funds will continue her groundbreaking research on probiotics and women’s health. 

Marilyn D. HarrisMarilyn D. Harris of the Pennsylvania State Nurses Association has received the Distinguished Membership Award from the American Nurses Association in recognition of her outstanding leadership and contributions to the organization’s mission. Harris also received the 2018 Granger Westberg Leadership in Faith Community Nursing Award from the Health Ministries Association. Following her retirement in 1999 from Abington Memorial Hospital in Abington, Pennsylvania, USA, she became the faith community nurse at Hatboro Baptist Church in Hatboro, Pennsylvania. In that capacity, she still makes hospital, home, and nursing home visits to members and coordinates various health classes.

Roberta HarrisonRoberta Harrison, an associate professor at Southern Illinois University Edwardsville School of Nursing in Edwardsville, Illinois, USA, was named associate dean for academic programs and community/global partnerships in June 2018. She had served as assistant dean for undergraduate programs since 2012 and has been a nursing faculty member since 2006. Harrison’s clinical areas of expertise include nursing management and leadership, acute rehabilitation nursing, and skilled nursing. Her scholarship activities have focused on combined lifestyle interventions, diabetes prevention, and stroke outcomes. 

Patricia A. HickeyPatricia A. Hickey, vice president and associate chief nursing officer, cardiovascular and critical care patient services at Boston Children’s Hospital in Boston, Massachusetts, USA, and an assistant professor of pediatrics at Harvard medical school, has been named 2019 Distinguished Research Lecturer by the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses. She is known internationally for her work in research and leadership development, care delivery innovation, patient safety, and bridging nursing practice and health policy. Her program of research examines the nursing and organizational factors associated with pediatric patient outcomes and the health of the work environment.

Cheryl Dennison HimmelfarbCheryl Dennison Himmelfarb, a professor at Johns Hopkins School of Nursing in Baltimore, Maryland, USA, was named the inaugural Sarah E. Allison professor for research and self-care in May 2018. The endowed chair was established to recognize nursing theorist Dorothea Orem for her Self-Care Deficit Theory and promote research that helps patients maintain dignity, function, and well-being. As a trailblazer in cardiovascular care and patient safety, Himmelfarb has aimed her work at reducing health disparities and improving the quality of care and outcomes for cardiovascular and critical care patients. In 2017, she was inducted into Sigma’s International Nurse Researcher Hall of Fame.

Janice HoffmanJanice Hoffman has been promoted to the rank of professor of nursing at The George Washington University School of Nursing in Washington, D.C., USA. With more than 38 years of experience, Hoffman has taught in baccalaureate, graduate, associate, and diploma nursing programs and has served in staff development positions in acute care and military facilities. She is senior associate dean for academic affairs at GW Nursing. Hoffman was selected to serve on the panel that developed the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Practice Transition Accreditation Program and has served on nurse residency program advisory boards for several acute care hospitals. She received the 2017 Capstone International Book Award from Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society of Nursing (Sigma) for her book, Medical-Surgical Nursing—Making Connections to Practice.

Sara Horton-Deutsch Sara Horton-Deutsch joined the faculty at the University of San Francisco School of Nursing and Health Professions in San Francisco, California, USA, as a full professor in August 2018. She previously served as the Jean Watson Caring Science chair at the University of Colorado, where she advanced the art and science of human caring knowledge, ethics, and clinical practice in nursing and health sciences. Her work in reflective practice has been published in two books co-authored with Gwen Sherwood and published by Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society of Nursing (Sigma): Reflective Practice: Transforming Education and Improving Outcomes and Reflective Organizations: On the Front Lines of QSEN & Reflective Practice Implementation. The latter received second place in the 2015 AJN Book of the Year Awards, Professional Issue category.

Matthew HowardMatthew Howard, director of educational resources for Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society of Nursing (Sigma), was elected student board member for the International Network for Doctoral Education in Nursing (INDEN) for 2018-2021. INDEN is a nonprofit professional association whose mission is to advance quality doctoral nursing education globally. Howard received his Doctor of Nursing Practice degree from Northern Kentucky University in 2018.

Patricia Kunz HowardPatricia Kunz Howard, enterprise director of emergency services at University of Kentucky Healthcare in Lexington, Kentucky, USA, has taken office as president of the Emergency Nurses Association (ENA) for the second time in her distinguished career. Since 1990, she has been actively involved in ENA, which has 43,000 members worldwide. She served as president in 2005 as part of a six-year stretch on the association's board of directors from 2000 to 2006. Howard is the first person in ENA's history to be elected president twice. Her platform for the year centers on inclusivity and diversity to enhance ENA's relevance to all emergency nurses, continued educational innovation, and injury prevention efforts that promote safe environments for patients and nurses.

Anne HysongAnne Hysong, a critical care clinical nurse specialist at Gwinnett Medical Center in Duluth, Georgia, USA, is serving as president of the National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists (NACNS) for 2018-19. She joined the board of directors in 2012. She previously was a trustee for the Clinical Nurse Specialist Institute. Hysong received the MSN Preceptor of the Year in 2013 from Mercer University and the Nurse Practitioner of the Year award in 2012 from the Gwinnett County Chamber of Commerce. She was a finalist for the Atlanta-Journal Constitution Nursing Excellence Awards in 2017 and a finalist in the APRN category for the 2013 March of Dimes Nurse of the Year award.

Shannon IdzikShannon Idzik, an associate professor and associate dean of the Doctor of Nursing Practice program at the University of Maryland School of Nursing in Baltimore, Maryland, USA, has been selected to serve on the National Clinical Care Commission. The commission presents recommendations to the secretary of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and to Congress on federal programs related to complex metabolic or autoimmune diseases resulting from insulin-related issues. Idzik will also help make recommendations to support clinicians in providing integrated, high-quality care to individuals with these diseases and related complications.

Rolanda JohnsonRolanda Johnson, assistant dean for academics and an associate professor of nursing, has been named assistant dean for diversity and inclusion for Vanderbilt University School of Nursing. She replaces Assistant Professor Jana Lauderdale, who returned to her faculty role. As assistant dean for diversity and inclusion, Johnson oversees the school’s efforts to support and foster an environment that is culturally appreciative and inclusive, particularly for historically underrepresented and marginalized groups and individuals. She also continues as assistant dean for academics, charged with assisting students who have special curriculum needs or experience academic difficulty.

Karen KestenKaren Kesten, an associate professor at George Washington University School of Nursing in Washington, D.C., USA, has been named director for DNP Projects. She most recently served as director of faculty initiatives for the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) and as liaison for the work of the APRN Clinical Training Task Force, the AACN Competency-Based Education for Doctoral-Prepared APRNs Work Group, the Implementation of the DNP Task Force, and the Task Force on Defining the Scholarship of Academic Nursing. 

Karen KestenElizabeth V. Kinchen, an assistant professor at the University of Central Florida College of Nursing in Orlando, Florida, USA, and board-certified advanced holistic nurse, received a research grant from the Florida Organization of Nurse Executives (FONE) for her study, “The preservation of holistic nursing values in nurse practitioner care.” The grant was awarded to Kinchen for the study’s valuable contribution to nursing knowledge, relevance to the organization’s priorities, and applicability to the healthcare environment. In addition to contributing to knowledge about holistic nursing practice and nurse practitioner care, results from the study may also provide guidance in the ongoing evaluation and revision of nurse practitioner programs.

Christine T. KovnerChristine T. Kovner, the Mathy Mezey professor of geriatric nursing at Rory Meyers College of Nursing in New York, New York, USA, has been appointed to the New York State Nursing Program Evaluation Commission. The commission will make recommendations on barriers to entry into nursing, availability and access to baccalaureate programs, financial barriers to entry into baccalaureate programs, and other equivalents through which nurses may obtain training and experience. Kovner was selected for the commission based on her research and expertise on nursing workforce issues. In June 2018, she also received the Research Mentorship Award from the Interdisciplinary Research Group on Nursing Issues of AcademyHealth. She is principal investigator of the TL1 program (T-32) at New York University’s Clinical and Translational Science Institute.

Cheryl A. Krause-ParelloCheryl A. Krause-Parello, an associate professor at the College of Nursing, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, has been named by the American Academy of Nursing as an Academy Edge Runner for the program she directs, Canines Providing Assistance to Wounded Warriors (CPAWW). Edge Runners are nurses who have designed innovative models of care or interventions that improve health, reduce cost, and influence policy. CPAWW builds community partnerships and investigates therapeutic canine interventions that positively influence health outcomes. Veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder who are provided a service dog are often able to decrease or stop psychotropic medications. It costs $4,000 per year to care for a service dog compared to $24,000 for a five-day inpatient hospitalization to treat PTSD. An estimated 20 U.S. veterans die each day by suicide. 

Ellen KurtzmanEllen Kurtzman has received tenure with The George Washington University School of Nursing in Washington, D.C., USA. An associate professor of nursing, she has been a faculty member since 2007. As a 2014-16 health policy fellow of the National Center for Health Statistics/AcademyHealth, she examined primary care practitioners’ quality of care in community health centers, with a special focus on the impact of state scope of practice policies on nurse practitioner-delivered care. Previously, she was the architect of national consensus standards for measuring nursing’s contribution to quality endorsed by the National Quality Forum (NQF). Kurtzman also led NQF’s national efforts to establish hospital and home healthcare quality and performance standards.

Jacqueline LopezJacqueline Lopez, senior nursing officer for the United States Branch Health Clinic in Sasebo, Japan, and department head for Medical Homeport and Primary Care, has received the American Psychiatric Nurses Association’s Excellence in Leadership—RN award for developing new core competencies in treating children and adolescents for the U.S. Navy. She spearheaded efforts to create standard competencies for restraint usage in Navy Medicine inpatient mental health units and led nurse generalists in three medical facilities in redesigning their inpatient mental health units.

John LoweJohn Lowe, the McKenzie endowed professor for health disparities research at Florida State University College of Nursing in Tallahassee, Florida, USA, received a $1.275 million grant from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, a branch of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Lowe, who is also director of the Center for Indigenous Nursing Research for Health Equity, is principal investigator for “Community Partnership for Preventing Health Risks Among Florida Urban American Indian & Alaska Native Young Adults.” The project will aim to provide a solid foundation for delivering sustainable, high-quality, accessible, state-of-the-science substance abuse; HIV/AIDS and viral hepatitis prevention research; and services to urban American Indian and Alaska Native young adults ages 18-24 who are living in Florida. Lowe’s project will include activities directed toward reducing substance abuse and transmission of HIV and viral hepatitis.

Susan LudingtonSusan Ludington, the Carl W. and Margaret Davis Walter professor of pediatric nursing at Case Western Reserve University’s Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing, received the Faces of Care Lifetime Achievement Award from the Greater Cleveland Nurses Association and Cleveland Magazine. She was recognized for her work in improving the well-being of newborns around the world and for her extensive commitment to teaching and mentoring others in nursing science and scholarly activities.

Nada LukkahataiNada Lukkahatai, an assistant professor at Johns Hopkins School of Nursing in Baltimore, Maryland, USA, was inducted as a fellow of the American Academy of Nursing during the academy’s annual policy conference in Washington, D.C., USA, in November 2018. Lukkahatai researches symptom biology and management, oncology, and interaction of behavior and biological processes. She is currently looking at the effects of nonpharmacological intervention, including technology-enhanced, home-based exercise programs. She examines auricular point acupressure in managing pain and fatigue, oxidative markers in patients with Alzheimer’s disease, and musculoskeletal symptoms in breast cancer survivors. Click here to access complete list of 2018 academy fellows.

Melissa MacogayMelissa Macogay has been named vice president and chief nursing officer of Johns Hopkins All Children’s Hospital. A registered nurse for more than 19 years, Macogay started as a nurse in the pediatric intensive care unit at The Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, Maryland, USA. She joined Johns Hopkins All Children’s in 2008 and served in multiple roles, including interim chief nursing officer, PICU director, and senior director of nursing for the Institute for Brain Protection Sciences.

Brenda MarshallBrenda Marshall, a professor in the Department of Nursing and director of the Center for Research in the College of Science and Health at William Paterson University in Wayne, New Jersey, USA, has received the 2018 Award for Excellence in Research from the American Psychiatric Nurses Association for her research on reducing the stigma associated with AIDS. She also received a Fulbright scholarship to teach about stigma reduction toward people with mental illness, substance use disorders, and those who are migrants with PTSD at the University of Malta, providing training on her “hearing voices” technique. Marshall hopes to bring American nursing students to study in Malta and to start a student organization there.

David MarshallDavid Marshall, chief nursing and patient care services executive at The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, was inducted as a fellow of the American Academy of Nursing during the academy’s annual policy conference in Washington, D.C., USA, in November 2018. Marshall oversees medical, surgical, and critical care nursing at all sites. Services he manages include women’s and children’s nursing, ambulatory nursing services, correctional nursing services, care management, nursing education, hospice care services, and patient services such as language services, volunteer services and pastoral care. Click here to access complete list of 2018 academy fellows.

Connie MeleConnie Mele has received  the American Psychiatric Nurses Association’s Award for Innovation—Individual for her efforts to introduce a new jail diversion model at the intersection of mental illness and the criminal justice system. She created a multipronged approach to address the mental health and substance use needs of the jail population while reducing the number of individuals with those needs behind bars. Recently retired as assistant health director of Mecklenberg County in North Carolina, USA, she is now a consultant in private practice.

Bernadette MelnykBernadette Melnyk, vice president for health promotion, university chief wellness officer, and dean and professor at The Ohio State University College of Nursing in Columbus, Ohio, USA, has received a 2018 Hillman Emergent Innovation grant for the project “Turning Sick Care Into Well Care for Homebound Older Adults and Their Pets.” POP (Pet Owner and Pet) Care creates an interprofessional team consisting of a nurse practitioner, veterinarian, and social worker to address the healthcare needs of homebound older adults and their pets. Melnyk also was elected to the National Forum for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention board of directors and has been selected as a member of Women of Impact, a group of high-profile female executives representing all sectors of the U.S. healthcare industry. In addition, she received the 2018 AACN Pioneering Spirit Award in May from the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses, recognizing her significant contributions to high-acuity and critical care nursing.

Elizabeth MizerekElizabeth Mizerek of New Egypt, New Jersey, USA, has been named a fellow of the Academy of Emergency Nursing. The Emergency Nurses Association (ENA) created the academy in 2004 to recognize members for their enduring and substantial contributions to emergency nursing throughout their careers. Additionally, inductees are honored as leaders in the ongoing effort to advance the profession and ENA. She is a member of Eta Beta Chapter at Widener University. Click here to view complete list of new fellows.

Marik MoenMarik Moen, an assistant professor at the University of Maryland School of Nursing in Baltimore, Maryland, USA, has received the 2018-19 Excellence in Advancing Nursing Science Award from the American Association of Colleges of Nursing. The award recognizes an outstanding dissertation by a student in a PhD in nursing or Doctor of Nursing Science program that has the potential to advance science, education, practice, and/or policy and adds to the scientific basis for nursing practice. Findings of her award-winning study, “Social Stability as a Consistent Measure of Social Context in a Low-Income Population,” revealed that social stability adequately captured the diversity of social contexts of a low-income population in Baltimore and consistently predicted exposure to sexual risk behaviors, substance use, and violence, especially combinations of these exposures.

Mary MollerMary Moller, an associate professor at Pacific Lutheran University School of Nursing and director of psychiatric services at Northwest Integrated Health in Tacoma, Washington, USA, has received the Psychiatric Nurse of the Year award from the American Psychiatric Nurses Association for her work with a program for treating schizophrenia. Moller developed a psychoeducational model that brought together patients, family members, and providers and created a series of community workshops about the importance of mental health. Her research interests include psychological adjustment to and symptom management in recovery from schizophrenia, a wellness approach to symptom management of recovery from trauma and abuse. Most recently, she has studied identification of motivational strategies for nurse recruitment and retention based on self-determination theory.

Malissa MulkeyMalissa Mulkey, a neuroscience clinical nurse specialist at Duke University Hospital and a doctoral student at East Carolina University College of Nursing in Greenville, North Carolina, USA, is principal investigator for a study of a physiological monitoring device to detect neuroelectrical changes that occur in the brain before patients show symptoms of delirium. Delirium occurs in about 80 percent of critically ill older adults and is associated with a 10-fold increase in long-term cognitive decline. Limited lead EEG devices such as Ceribell (FDA-approved in 2017 to monitor seizures) can process an EEG with predetermined algorithms. These devices, which can be applied by nurses, may provide an earlier, more accurate physiological assessment of delirium than bedside clinical assessment tools such as the CAM-ICU. The study received an Impact Research Grant from the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

Donna Nickitas Donna Nickitas was appointed dean at Rutgers University School of Nursing-Camden in Camden, New Jersey, USA, effective 1 July 2018. She previously was a professor at City University of New York’s Hunter-Bellevue School of Nursing and The Graduate Center, where she was executive officer of the nursing science PhD program. Nickitas is the author, co-author, or co-editor of several peer-reviewed books related to the nursing profession, including Public Policy and Politics for Nurses and Other Health Professionals and Reviews & Rationales: Nursing Leadership & Management. She is also editor of Nursing Economic$.

Marliese Nist Marliese Nist was awarded a 2018 March of Dimes Graduate Nursing Scholarship for postgraduate studies in the field of maternal-child nursing. She is pursuing a PhD in nursing at The Ohio State University School of Nursing. Her research focus is on the neurodevelopment of very preterm babies. As a NICU nurse, Nist has firsthand experience in the NICU environment and is concerned about how the extreme stress experienced by babies during hospitalization may affect their developing brains. She seeks to determine the relationships among stress exposure, inflammation, and neurodevelopment in the hope of identifying ways to improve the care of these infants.

Patricia Normandin Patricia Normandin of Chelmsford, Massachusetts, USA, has been named a fellow of the Academy of Emergency Nursing. The Emergency Nurses Association (ENA) created the academy in 2004 to recognize members for their enduring and substantial contributions to emergency nursing throughout their careers. Additionally, inductees are honored as leaders in the ongoing effort to advance the profession and ENA. Click here to view complete list of new fellows.

Sarah E. OertherSarah E. Oerther, a nursing instructor and PhD student at Saint Louis University School of Nursing in St. Louis, Missouri, USA, has been named a Jonas Policy Scholar by the American Academy of Nursing. Funded by the Jonas Center for Nursing and Veterans Healthcare, the two-year fellowship sequence connects emerging scholars with leading nurse experts to learn about major health policy issues. Oerther was named to the Psychiatric, Mental Health and Substance Abuse Expert Panel. Internationally, she has served as the nurse in charge of designing, implementing, and assessing a comprehensive nutrition program for three villages in rural Tanzania. She also has hospital nursing experience in Mumbai, India. In 2017, she was named a fellow of the Royal Society for Public Health. Her dissertation research is on health-promoting mothering practices of immigrant Muslim women.

Virginia Peragallo-DittkoVirginia Peragallo-Dittko, executive director of the Diabetes and Obesity Institute at NYU Winthrop Hospital in Mineola, New York, USA, was inducted as a fellow of the American Academy of Nursing during the academy’s annual policy conference in Washington, D.C., USA, in November 2018. Under her leadership, the hospital’s Diabetes Education Program became the first in New York State to be accredited by the American Diabetes Association. Peragallo-Dittko works with nearly every specialty of the hospital to bridge the chain of diabetes and obesity-related healthcare and research new ways to understand and manage the conditions. Click here to access complete list of 2018 academy fellows.

Kristi Renea PerezKristi Renea Perez, a registered nurse in the Progressive Care Unit at Banner Estrella Medical Center in Phoenix, Arizona, USA, has been awarded two DAISY Awards for providing extraordinary care to patients. She was also the first staff member to be highlighted in the “Employee Spotlight” campaign to strategically recruit through social media outlets and encourage other nurses to work at Banner Health. Perez started her nursing career in April 2018 and is currently enrolled in a master’s program at Grand Canyon University in Phoenix. She was inducted as a member of Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society of Nursing (Sigma) in December 2018.

Cynthia L. RennCynthia L. Renn, an associate professor at the University of Maryland School of Nursing in Baltimore, Maryland, USA, has been awarded a five-year, $3.1 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to investigate chronic pain in trauma patients suffering from lower-leg fractures. Renn and her team seek to examine if psychological, clinical, and sociodemographic factors are predictive of chronic pain characteristics in patients during the year following a lower-extremity fracture. Renn was inducted as a fellow of the American Academy of Nursing during the academy’s annual policy conference in Washington, D.C., USA, in November 2018. Click here to access complete list of 2018 academy fellows.

Michael RiceMichael Rice, professor and endowed chair of psychiatric nursing at the University of Colorado in Aurora, Colorado, USA, has received the 2018 Award for Distinguished Service from the American Psychiatric Nurses Association for his work as a passionate advocate for the field across both the lifespan and care settings. He also received the Hildegard Peplau Award from the American Nurses Association, honoring his contributions to nursing practice through a lifetime of scholarly activities, clinical practice, and policy development in psychosocial and psychiatric aspects of nursing care delivery.

Cynda RushtonCynda Rushton, the Anne and George L. Bunting professor of clinical ethics at Johns Hopkins School of Nursing in Baltimore, Maryland, USA, is one of only two nurses selected to serve on a newly formed National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine committee to develop recommendations for systemic solutions to combating clinician burnout. A founding member of the Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics, Rushton has been internationally recognized for her contributions to bioethics, ethics education, and clinical ethics consultation. Her most recent work has been designing, implementing, and evaluating the Mindful Ethical Practice and Resilience Academy (MEPRA) to build moral resilience in frontline nurses who face ethical challenges related to patient suffering, adequacy of informed consent, resource allocation, and ineffective communication and care coordination.

Pamela Slaven-Lee Pamela Slaven-Lee has been promoted to the rank of clinical associate professor of nursing at The George Washington University School of Nursing (GW Nursing) in Washington, D.C., USA. She is an assistant dean for the MSN program and a certified healthcare simulation educator. In collaboration with program faculty, Slaven-Lee incorporated simulation education into the GW Nursing graduate curriculum, which she has shared with the nursing profession as a Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society of Nursing (Sigma) leadership academy scholar. 

Diane SpatzDiane Spatz, a nurse researcher and director of the lactation program at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, served as guest editor for the April/June 2018 edition of the Journal of Perinatal and Neonatal Nursing. Her research on the Spatz 10-Step and Breastfeeding Resource Nurse Model to Improve Human Milk and Breastfeeding Outcomes was recently published in that edition. The model consists of informed decision, establishment and maintenance of milk supply, human milk management, oral care and feeding of human milk, skin-to-skin care, non-nutritive sucking, transition to breast, measuring milk transfer, preparation for discharge, and appropriate follow-up.

Danielle Steele Danielle Steele is one of five nurse practitioner students selected to receive a traineeship grant to participate in the Advanced Nursing Education Workforce (ANEW) program of Nicole Wertheim College of Nursing & Health Sciences at Florida International University in Miami, Florida, USA. ANEW is a two-year, $1.39 million nursing education initiative funded by the U.S. Human Resources & Services Administration to prepare advanced practice nurses to provide primary care in rural and underserved areas. Steele has provided care as a volunteer to underserved populations in Florida and Georgia. She most recently volunteered with the United States Public Health Service Corps to assist with Hurricane Irma. She is a mentor for Big Brothers Big Sisters and works as an ICU nurse at Memorial Regional Hospital in Hollywood, Florida.

Sarah L. SzantonSarah L. Szanton, a professor at Johns Hopkins School of Nursing and Bloomberg School of Public Health in Baltimore, Maryland, USA, has been named an Academy Edge Runner by the American Academy of Nursing for her intervention, “Community Aging in Place: Advancing Better Living for Elders (CAPABLE).” The academy’s Raise the Voice Edge Runner initiative recognizes nurse-designed models of care or interventions that improve health, reduce cost, and influence policy. Szanton and her cross-disciplinary colleague, sociologist Laura Gitlin, designed CAPABLE to deliver a personalized, at-home intervention that decreases disability and improves physical strength and self-care skills of older adults. Johns Hopkins School of Nursing recently received nearly $3 million to fund large-scale, national implementation of the CAPABLE program. Szanton was named the inaugural endowed professor in health equity and social justice in June 2018. The chair will be named the Patricia M. Davidson health equity and social justice chair upon completion of Davidson’s tenure as dean.

Tami Thomas Tami Thomas was appointed associate dean of research at the Florida International University (FIU) Nicole Wertheim College of Nursing & Health Sciences. Her responsibilities include spearheading the college’s research and faculty development initiatives and serving as director of the PhD in nursing program. Thomas is an award-winning nurse educator and prolific researcher who is recognized nationally and internationally as an expert in health promotion. Her work has been credited with improving adolescent health and access to primary care for underserved populations.

Susan ThraneSusan Thrane, an assistant professor at The Ohio State University College of Nursing in Columbus, Ohio, USA, is co-leader of a multidisciplinary research team that will assess the effects of Reiki, a complementary health therapy, on pain and anxiety in critically ill older adults. The American Association of Critical-Care Nurses has awarded an Impact Research Grant to support the Reiki Intervention for Seriously Ill Elders-Intensive Care Unit study, which will assess whether Reiki is superior to sham Reiki placebo and usual care when delivered to critically ill older adults who require mechanical ventilation.

Jessica Ann Trivett Jessica Ann Trivett of North Middletown, New Jersey, USA, has been named a fellow of the Academy of Emergency Nursing. The Emergency Nurses Association (ENA) created the academy in 2004 to recognize members for their enduring and substantial contributions to emergency nursing throughout their careers. Additionally, inductees are honored as leaders in the ongoing effort to advance the profession and ENA. Click here to view complete list of new fellows.

Cynthia VlasichCynthia Vlasich, director of global initiatives at Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society of Nursing (Sigma), was inducted as a fellow of the American Academy of Nursing during ceremonies at the organization’s annual policy conference in Washington, D.C., USA, in November 2018. As director of global initiatives, she works to expand Sigma's reach and reputation globally through maintaining its Economic and Social Consultative Status with the United Nations, developing global healthcare leaders, expanding relationships with global healthcare organizations, and presenting information about Sigma around the world. Vlasich served as chief nurse of the American Red Cross for nearly a decade. During that time, she chaired the Global Advisory Group for Nursing under the International Committee of the Red Cross. She has been both a member and chair of the United States Federal Nursing Chiefs Council and has coordinated nursing involvement for various international relief missions. Prior to her appointment as chief nurse, Vlasich provided nursing leadership and support to Americans stationed in Europe and the Middle East as director of nursing and health services for the European Area of the American Red Cross. Click here to access complete list of 2018 academy fellows.

Kathleen VollmanKathleen Vollman, an acute and critical care clinical nurse specialist and president of Advancing Nursing LLC, has received the Clinical Nurse Specialist of the Year Award from the National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists (NACNS). The award recognizes an NACNS member for outstanding professional achievement in all aspects of CNS practice. Vollman is also an adjunct faculty member for Michigan State University’s Clinical Nurse Specialist Graduate Program in Lansing, Michigan, USA.

Ann H. WhiteAnn H. White, dean of the College of Nursing and Health Professions at the University of Southern Indiana in Evansville, Indiana, USA, has been elected to the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education board of commissioners, representing chief nursing administrators from across the United States. A professor of nursing, she previously served the college as interim dean, associate dean of nursing, and program director for the Doctor of Nursing Practice program. She joined the university in 1990.

James Whyte IVJames Whyte IV, a professor at Florida State University College of Nursing in Tallahassee, Florida, USA, was inducted as a fellow of the American Academy of Nursing during ceremonies at the organization’s annual policy conference in Washington, D.C., USA, in November 2018. Whyte began his professional career in the U.S. Marines Nurse Corps. Following his military service, he entered academia to further his work with young people and engage his program of research. Whyte maintains an active clinical practice as a nurse practitioner with a focus in family and pediatric care, orthopedics and sports medicine, and people living with HIV/AIDS. Click here to access complete list of 2018 academy fellows.

Chris WinkelmanChris Winkelman, an associate professor at Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio, USA, is leading a study that will explore the knowledge, behaviors, and attitudes of registered nurses and advanced practice nurses toward patient assessment of mobility readiness and implementation of mobility interventions. As part of the analysis, the researchers will examine the impact of nursing certification on implementation of mobility interventions for patients who are critically ill. Winkelman was among the first researchers to explore positive outcomes of progressive mobility for critically ill adults. The project received the 2018 Sigma Theta Tau International/American Association of Critical-Care Nursing grant.

Rebecca WisemanRebecca Wiseman, an associate professor and chair of the University of Maryland School of Nursing at the Universities at Shady Grove, has been awarded a $265,467 Nurse Support Program II grant to establish the Maryland Nursing Workforce Center at the University of Maryland Baltimore in Baltimore, Maryland, USA. Funded through the Maryland Health Services Cost Review Commission and administered by the Maryland Higher Education Commission, the grant will fund the project over two years. Through the project, Wiseman will ensure the state is meeting the recommendation in the Institute of Medicine’s report calling for improved workforce data collection. The Maryland Nursing Workforce Center will compile and report data to plan future workforce needs and to measure the success of programs and initiatives.

Chao Hsing YehChao Hsing Yeh, an associate professor at Johns Hopkins School of Nursing in Baltimore, Maryland, USA, was inducted as a fellow of the American Academy of Nursing during the academy’s annual policy conference in Washington, D.C., USA, in November 2018. As a researcher, she examines nonpharmacological management and the mechanisms and efficacy of auricular point acupressure to manage pain in adults, patients with Alzheimer’s disease and their caregivers, and cancer patients. She was a 2018 recipient of the Johns Hopkins University Discovery Award and is currently studying the scientific underpinnings of using acupressure to provide pain relief of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy. She has recently been funded by the National Institute on Aging to study the efficacy of auricular point acupressure in managing chronic low back pain in older adults. Click here to access complete list of 2018 academy fellows. RNL

—Compiled by Jane Palmer, Assistant Editor
Reflections on Nursing Leadership

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