RNews Digest: 5 May 2017

By RNL Editors | 05/05/2017

News and perspectives important to RNs and the profession of nursing, gathered from sources around the world.  

5 surprising facts about hand washing
Scrubs, 3 May 2017
Doubling hand washing time to 30 seconds can lead to an overall 10x reduction in the presence of harmful bacteria. Cold water is just as effective at washing hands as hot water.

A trauma nurse reflects on 'compassion fatigue'
NPR Shots, Meredith Rizzo, 30 April 2017
Sometimes, even professionally compassionate people get tired. Kristin Laurel, a flight nurse from Waconia, Minnesota, has worked in trauma units for over two decades. The daily exposure to distressing situations can sometimes result in compassion fatigue.

Parents as mentors: Observations of a peds/NICU nurse
AJN Off the Charts (Blog), Jody Holland, 1 May 2017
My most influential mentors have been parents of infants and children who have been placed in my care. Parents do not ask for their child to be born early or develop a devastating illness, but these parents summon great strength when it’s needed.

What's the right way to list your nursing credentials?
Nurse.com (Blog), Jennifer Mensik, 4 May 2017
We have all seen multiple streams of initials after nurses’ names. This can make someone seem intimidating, especially if the credentials are paired with a long work title. A frequently asked question is how should nurses list their nursing credentials after their name.

Minnesota sees largest outbreak of measles in almost 30 years
The New York Times, Christopher Mele, 5 May 2017
Health officials are grappling with the largest outbreak of measles in Minnesota in almost 30 years, which is mainly sickening young children of Somali immigrants who fell under the sway of anti-vaccination activists.

2017’s best & worst states for nurses
WalletHub, John S. Kiernan, 3 May 2017
Despite the challenges of day-to-day demands, such as mandatory overtime, unionization, and allegations of systemic disrespect, aspiring nurses have much to look forward to. Nursing occupations are some of the most lucrative careers with the lowest unemployment rates in the U.S.

Nurses are setting a healthy example for the nation
Huffington Post, Pamela F. Cipriano, 1 May 2017
Compared to the average American, nurses are more likely to be overweight, have higher levels of stress, and get less than the recommended hours of sleep. And, healthcare workers experience the highest rate of non-fatal occupational injuries and illnesses of any sector.

The 28-hour workday controversy—do long working hours help or harm patients?
Scrubs, 5 May 2017
In recent days, the medical world has seen itself mixed up in a bit of controversy related to the long working hours common among medical professionals—including doctors, nurses, and other hospital staff.

Race plays role in heart, diabetes risk, even at normal weight
HealthDay, Robert Preidt, 3 April 2017
Americans of South Asian and Hispanic descent who aren't overweight may be more at risk for heart disease, stroke, and diabetes than normal-weight white people are.

Toddlers’ screen time linked to slower speech development
PBS Newshour, Nsikan Akpan, 4 May 2017
Hand-held screens might delay a child’s ability to form words. This preliminary study is the first to show how mobile devices impact speech development in children, raising a question that fills the minds of many parents: How much time should my child spend with a mobile device?

Are patients with minor ailments visiting the doctor [or NP] too often?
KevinMD.com (Blog), Yul Ejnes, 28 April 2017
Lately, I’ve been asking myself whether today’s patient is less able to self-manage minor illnesses than their parents or grandparents. That question was inspired by my review of notes from my patients’ visits with my nurse practitioners or to our after-hours clinic, as well as some of my own patient encounters. 

The nursing skills gap continues to grow while 70 percent of nurses feel burnt out
PR Newswire, 5 May 2017
Day-to-day demands and high pressure situations have 7 in 10 nurses saying they feel burnt out in their current job. While three quarters of nurses say they are satisfied with their jobs overall, a third are dissatisfied with their career progress, and 22 percent are dissatisfied with their work/life balance.

—Compiled by Jane Palmer, Assistant Editor
Reflections on Nursing Leadership

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