RNews Digest: 21 July 2017

By RNL Editors | 07/21/2017

News and perspectives important to RNs and the profession of nursing, gathered from sources around the world.

The ongoing debate: To vaccinate or not to vaccinate children?
Scrubs, 18 July 2017
For decades, people concerned with the health of the population have been getting involved in the ongoing debate about vaccinations: Should there be a ban on unvaccinated children? 

Connecting emotional intelligence, team communication, and patient safety
AJN Off the Charts, Betsy Todd, 17 July 2017
In today’s rapid-fire health care settings, communication is often rushed and incomplete. This can result in errors or in a frightening and unsupportive environment that strains the patient’s coping skills.

The myth of drug expiration dates
ProPublica, Marshall Allen, 18 July 2017
What if the system is destroying drugs that are technically “expired” but could still be safely used? Some medical providers have pushed for a changed approach to drug expiration dates—with no success.

Racial preferences for caregivers don’t hold up
Nurse.com, Nancy J. Brent, 19 July 2017
A reader asked about a situation in which an African-American patient wanted only African-American nurses to care for her. The employer went along with this request. Nursing staff of other races were hindered in their ability to care for African-American patients.

When the nurse becomes the patient
Nurse Keith’s Digital Doorway, Keith Carlson, 17 July 2017
While nurses have a great deal of experience treating and caring for patients, unforeseen circumstances will occasionally cause the tables to turn, giving the nurse the chance to be a patient. This became my personal reality just last week. 

PTSD and falls: For the elderly, a lost sense of safety and control
AJN Off the Charts, Scott Janssen, 19 July 2017
Most health care professionals are unaware that falls in the elderly can cause posttraumatic stress symptomatology, acute stress disorder, even PTSD. Indeed, in some settings falls occur frequently enough to insulate nurses and other medical staff from the awareness of how terrifying such an event can be.

Treating the patients we cannot reach
KevinMD.com, Anne Katz, 17 July 2017
I think about the frustration of a nurse who continues to try to reach a 30-year-old patient with stage III kidney cancer. Reading between the lines of the entries in his medical record, I saw the patient’s fear and terror of the cancer that surgery did not control.

More than a cure
Emory Nursing, Maria M. Lameiras, Summer 2017
While many researchers race to identify new targets for treatment and formulate new therapies, a growing cadre of School of Nursing researchers is leading the nation in studies that examine the patient experience and how patient-reported outcomes can inform cancer care.

Nursing shortages fuelling delayed discharge from hospital
The Guardian, David Brindle, 20 July 2017
There is no doubt that delays in arranging follow-on social care are causing more older people to be stranded in hospital. But a new analysis of the problem says shortage of district nurses is at least as big a factor.

Most women should forgo ovarian cancer screening: Panel
HealthDay, 18 July 2017
The potential harms of ovarian cancer screening outweigh the benefits, so only very specific groups of women should be screened for the disease, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force says in a draft recommendation.

Ready for a disaster? if not, it will cost you.
HealthLeaders Media, Jennifer Thew, 18 July 2017
Orlando Health's corporate manager of emergency preparedness talks about his experience with the Pulse nightclub shooting and how healthcare leaders can better prepare their organizations to handle disasters.

Nurse practitioners urge increased education and advocacy to combat opioid epidemic
The Nurse Practitioner Association New York State, 18 July 2017
Heroin and opiates are now reported to be the leading cause of accidental death in New York State. The Nurse Practitioner Association New York State is calling for a multifaceted approach for safe and effective pain management and prevention of opioid misuse and abuse.

Scans may show consciousness in 'comatose' patients
HealthDay, 20 July 2017
Sophisticated brain scans might be able to detect consciousness in brain injury patients who appear unconscious in the intensive care unit, a new study says.

 

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  • RNews Digest: 14 July 2017